The University Of Sheffield
Krebs Festival

EXPLORING HIDDEN WORLDS
OCTOBER – NOVEMBER 2015

Today’s cutting edge research

The great legacy of Sir Hans Krebs, both for Sheffield and the world, is in demonstrating how we can use scientific methods and understanding to uncover the hidden workings of life. In 1988 the Krebs Institute was established at the University of Sheffield. The Krebs Institute brings together scientists to build on this legacy in understanding those mechanisms in biology that underpin life on earth. Molecular science research at Sheffield is embodied within three projects that describe our vision for the next 10 years: Imagine, the Grantham Centre and Florey.

Watch interviews with our academics on Sheffield iTunesU


imagine

IMAGINE: IMAGING LIFE

The University of Sheffield is establishing a world-class centre developing and applying revolutionary microscope technologies, that allow scientists to see the intricate inner workings of life in unprecedented detail. We are using these insights to unravel how microbes like the MRSA bacteria grow and evade the immune system and how solar energy is converted into chemical energy during photosynthesis.

imagine-imaginglife.com


grantham

THE GRANTHAM CENTRE

The Grantham Centre for Sustainable Futures is an ambitious and innovative collaboration between the University of Sheffield and the Grantham Foundation for the Protection of the Environment. Our sustainability research creates knowledge and connects it to policy debates on how to build a fairer world and save natural resources for future generations. One example of such research is that undertaken in the Plant Production and Protection (P3) centre where world-leading scientists are translating our basic plant and soil sciences research into practical solutions to feed the world’s expanding population.

grantham.sheffield.ac.uk


western-bank

FLOREY INSTITUTE: TACKLING INFECTIOUS DISEASE

Inspired by the work of Nobel Prize winner Sir Howard Florey, we are striving to save lives by understanding how infective bacteria (pathogens) interact with our immune system (the host). Sir Howard Florey was a former Chair of Pathology at the University of Sheffield. He went on to carry out the first clinical trials for penicillin – a drug that saved millions of lives worldwide. Our goal is to solve major issues in infectious diseases – such as anti-microbial drug resistance – through a new, holistic approach to managing infection, that is less reliant on using antibiotics to kill the bacteria.

floreyinstitute.com